Six Elements of Instruction for Every Child

Here, we outline six elements of instruction that every child should experience every day. Each of these elements can be implemented in any district and any school, with any curriculum or set of materials, and without additional funds. All that’s necessary is for adults to make the decision to do it.

1. Every child reads something he or she chooses.

The research base on student-selected reading is robust and conclusive: Students read more, understand more, and are more likely to continue reading when they have the opportunity to choose what they read. In a 2004 meta-analysis, Guthrie and Humenick found that the two most powerful instructional design factors for improving reading motivation and comprehension were (1) student access to many books and (2) personal choice of what to read. read more

Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices

When presented with new material, standards, and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments. We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur.

Brain Breaks

A brain break is a short period of time when we change up the dull routine of incoming information that arrives via predictable, tedious, well-worn roadways. Our brains are wired for novelty because we pay attention to any and every stimulus in our environment that feels threatening or out of the ordinary. This has always been a wonderful advantage because our survival as a species depended on this aspect of brain development.

When we take a brain break, it refreshes our thinking and helps us discover another solution to a problem or see a situation through a different lens. Consider trying these with your class:read more

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 A Complementary e-Book from Nellie Edge and Colleagues
Joyful Writing-to-Read Kindergartens Accelerate Literacy and Smiles

Ways to get Ideas for Writing

In Crafting Writers K-6 , 2008, Elizabeth Hale introduced “Memory Sparkers” and “Ways to Get Ideas for Writing”. These simple statements are fresh ideas for a long standing problem. She suggests these ideas become an anchor chart in your classroom so students can refer to it if they become stuck. writing ideas

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